Taking care of your most Precious Cargo is Our top Priority!

Westgreen Subdivision
Katy, TX 77449

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Some children take 2 – 3 weeks to accept their new surroundings.

After that – you will be amazed!


YOU WILL NEED TO BRING:

2 PANTS, 2 SHIRTS, 2 PAIRS OF SOCKS, 2 PAIR OF UNDERWEAR

SPECIAL SLEEP TOY (OPT)

SUNSCREEN

WET WIPES

LARGE PACKAGE OF DIAPERS,

OINTMENT OR POWDER

INSECT REPELLENT

BIBS


***PLEASE LABEL, LABEL, AND LABEL!!!***


PLEASE NOTE ANY SPECIFIC NEEDS:  I.E. LACTAID MILK, PACIFIER…

What Not to Bring From Home


Toys of violence (i.e. guns, knives, bows and arrows, etc.)

Candy

Chewing gum

Anything unlabeled

A Frown!!!

Shhhh!!!
Rest/Quiet Time
12:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

It is very important that our children get the proper rest they need.  Please if at all possible, please restrain from call during our rest/quiet time unless it is extremely important.

Please inform us upon arrival if you are planning to pick your child(ren) up early.  This information will help us to make every effort not to disturb the children that are asleep.  We understand that emergencies do arrive without warning and we do take that into consideration.

Thank you in advance.

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving "bye bye" are called developmental milestones.  Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave and move (crawling, walking, etc.).  Click on the link below to see the milestones.

Reading to young children is one of the very best things that parents can do for them.


Infants will associate reading with attention, love and pretty pictures.  As children get older, parents can introduce them to picture books and nursery rhymes.


They’ll discover that books are read from front to back and that pictures stand for real objects.  They’ll find out that the print on the pages stands for words and that pages are read from top-to-bottom and left–to-right.


Reading to young children is excellent preparation for formal reading instruction in school.


So much of the intelligence children will ultimately have is developed before they even get to kindergarten.


When you read to them, you are building pathways in their brains needed for successful reading experiences.


They will be developing auditory perception that allows them to think about how words sound.


Reading stimulates children’s language development. Listening to stories will enhance their vocabularies and help them use longer sentences.  It increases their attention spans and ability to focus to what is being said.


Reading makes children more curious – a trait that must be fostered in young children or they will never acquire it.


Their knowledge of the world will expand and reading to young children gives them a desire to read.


Using the following activities to help your child develop the precision, balance, and hand-eye coordination that are needed to perform the fine motor skills used in handwriting.


  1. Have your children play with clay or Play-Doh to strengthen the major muscles used in handwriting.
  2. Encourage their play with Lego, miniature cars, small blocks, action figures, and other small toys.
  3. Do puzzles with your children.
  4. Provide creative artwork that involves using crayons, marking pens, scissors, and finger paints, as well as tearing paper.
  5. Play games with your children that involve the handling of cards and small game pieces.

The Benefits of Preschool for Your Child


The chance to interact with other children is the benefit of preschool interacting with other children means:

  1. Learning how to wait
  2. How to take turns
  3. How to listen
  4. Children learn social skills when they interact with other children. These social skills are critical to a developing personality.

There are other advantages to preschools – primarily which they are in the foundations for academic learning.


In preschool your child will:

  1. Listen to poetry and songs – building blocks needed to grasp phonics and reading skills.
  2. The play that takes place with water, sand and containers form the foundation for understanding some basic math concepts.
  3. Matching, sequencing, one-to-one correspondence are all activities that are done over and over in preschool settings and help children get ready to learn academics.
  4. Watching other children pursue a challenging task is also helpful.
  5. The presence of other children and a wide variety of materials are two big reasons why a preschool is a good thing.


It is definitely important for your son/daughter to have interaction with other children his/her age. In fact, research has shown that peer relationships contribute a great deal too social development and to the effectiveness with which people function as adults.


Indeed, the single best childhood predictor of adult adaptation is not IQ, not school grades, and not classroom behavior – what matters is how the child gets along with other children.